Nigerian Jollof Wraps Feast chukus
Nigerian Jollof Wraps Feast chukus
Nigerian Jollof Wraps Feast chukus
Nigerian Jollof Wraps Feast chukus
Nigerian Jollof Wraps Feast chukus
Nigerian Jollof Wraps Feast chukus
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Nigerian Jollof Wraps

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“Chuku’s is a celebration of our culture,” says co-founder Ifeyinwa Frederick, “all our dishes are centred on authentic Nigerian flavours.” For their at-home menu, Ifeyinwa and Emeka Frederick have taken some of Chuku’s most popular dishes and combined them in hearty, filled wraps.

Along with a choice of proteins, the wraps are packed with a crunchy carrot and cabbage salad and Chuku’s signature jollof quinoa – “this is our spin on Nigeria’s most celebrated dish, jollof rice,” says Emeka, “we use house-smoked quinoa to replicate the flavour you get from cooking over an open fire, which is how jollof is cooked at Nigerian parties and special occasions.” The quinoa is steamed with a tomato and red pepper-based jollof sauce.

“Beef ayamase is a Yoruba dish from south west Nigeria,” explains Emeka, “it’s made with a spicy green pepper and scotch bonnet sauce, flavoured with irú (fermented locust beans) and smoked, dried crayfish for a robust, umami taste.” Emeka slow-cooks beef brisket until tender, then shreds this into his ayamase sauce.

For something sweeter, opt for Chuku’s honey suya chicken. “Suya is the name of the mixed spice which originates from Northern Nigeria and the Hausa people. It's an aromatic blend of cloves, ginger, chillies and kuli kuli – a fried peanut-based snack,” says Emeka. “Suya is also one of the most popular street foods in Nigeria, where skewered meats are marinated in this spice seasoning before being grilled”. Emeka combines his suya spice with honey for a sweetness that pairs well with the savoury, smoky jollof quinoa.

For the tofu, Emeka makes a well-seasoned, mild, tomato and red pepper-based sauce, which he uses to coat deep-fried, smoked tofu.

Alongside the wraps, Chuku’s popular dodo (fried plantain) is tossed in cinnamon, sugar, and desiccated coconut for a hum of sweetness, while the adalu is made from slow-cooked Nigerian 'honey beans' and sweetcorn.