Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae 24th September Two Bulgogi Beef
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae 24th September Two Bulgogi Mushroom
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae 24th September One Bulgogi Mushroom and one Beef
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Korean Bibimbap Feast jae 24th September Two Bulgogi Beef
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Korean Bibimbap Feast jae
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Korean Bibimbap Feast jae 24th September One Bulgogi Mushroom and one Beef
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Korean Bibimbap

Regular price
£55.00
Sale price
£55.00
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Tax included.

For his latest menu, chef Jay Morjaria takes inspiration from Korean ‘anju’ – the small plates served alongside alcohol in Korea. The menu starts with a selection of anju, starting with punchy seasonal pickles and nori crisps sprinkled with kimchi dust. “For the dust, we turn kimchi into a powder using a dehydrator,” Jay explains “we sprinkle this over our nori crisps and it gives exactly the same flavour as if you were eating kimchi.” The crisps are also served with a sweet-spicy kimchi relish for dunking.

Next, trout is lightly cured in salt and brown sugar until beautifully firm, then paired with a tangy yuzu and mustard dressing and finished with a delicate chive oil. There’s also roasted, Sussex-grown squash with a doengjang sauce. “Doengjang is like a Korean miso,” explains Jay, “it’s a soybean paste which is super funky, and umami-heavy. We combine it with dashi, maple syrup, mirin, saké and roasted garlic to create the sauce for the squash, then finish the dish with a powdered nori, Korean chilli pepper and pumpkin seed crumble.”

For the main event, choose between traditional beef bibimbap, or a vegetarian mushroom version.“Bimimbap means ‘mixed rice,’” explains Jay, “it’s a fun, messy dish – you’re supposed to mix all the elements together before you eat it”. Rice is topped with either bulgogi-marinated beef or mushrooms as well as house-made kimchi; seasoned vegetables, a sweet-spicy gochujang sauce and an egg which has been slow-cooked at 63 degrees until silky-soft, known as an ‘onsen egg’. For the beef, Jay uses high-welfare, British beef chuck, which he braises in bulgogi sauce for six hours until soft and broken down, resulting in a texture akin to pulled pork. For the mushroom, grey oyster mushrooms are used for their meaty consistency.

To finish, a rich, dark chocolate ganache is paired with miso-spiked caramel and finished with sweet-glazed, crispy puffed rice.