Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
Korean Anju Feast JAE
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Korean Anju Feast JAE
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Korean Anju Feast JAE

Korean Anju

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Chef Jay Morjaria draws on the traditions of Korean drinking culture for this menu: “I spent a few years training in Seoul, where every night people go out to meet friends after work. You never really drink without food there, and ‘anju’ refers to the food served throughout the night: it’s salty, sweet and sour, hitting all the tastebuds.”

The menu begins with nori crisps with kimchi relish and punchy seasonal pickles that can be snacked on while cooking the rest of the anju. With a changing selection of produce arriving from farms around Kent and Sussex, there might be tomatoes, onions, or mooli marinated in chilli-laced or sweet and sour brines. Jay suggests pairing the anju with beers, spritzes or highball cocktails as they do in Seoul.

In the stir fried aubergine different textures combine, from the soft aubergine flesh to the sticky coconut lime ssamjang to the crunchy coriander panko crumbs. Catch of the day crudo, Tabasco ponzu, chervil showcases Jay’s love of combining cuisines: while not Korean, the ponzu and chervil give a heavy hit of umami. The crudo might feature chalk stream trout, depending on what the fishmonger sends Jay each day. Gently smoked duck breast is served with Korean-Russian kimchi - an unusual recipe that has its roots in the Korean communities which emigrated to Russia and couldn’t find radishes for their kimchi, so used carrots instead. For the main event, mushroom bibimbap is a fun, messy dish. With ‘bibimbap’ meaning ‘to mix rice’, Jay suggests eaters muddle the elements of rice, soy-marinated mushrooms, soft boiled egg, beansprouts, spring onions, ssamjang and kimchi according to their preference. Korean desserts combine the sweet with the savoury, and this one is inspired by ‘gangjeong’, a popular children’s sweet made with rice. Sweet puffed rice is toasted and glazed with syrup, served with a miso-spiked caramel and dark chocolate ganache.