Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
Japanese Izakaya Feast MACHIYA
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Japanese Izakaya

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£55.00
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£55.00
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Tax included.

“Our menu is izakaya-style,” explains group head chef George Elia, “so it’s made up of several different Japanese small plates, designed to be eaten together and shared.”

Machiya’s amusu pickled bean sprouts are a perfect palette cleanser – “the idea is that you have a few bites of the meat and rice, then some pickles,” he says. Bean sprouts are steeped in a traditional amasu (vinegar and sugar) pickling liquor to create a refreshing, crunchy pickle with just the right balance of sweetness and acidity.

“For our shake teriyaki, we use daily-caught Scottish Loch salmon from Wright Brothers,” says George, “we marinate it overnight in a sweet-salty teriyaki stock made from soy sauce, saké and mirin.” It’s then ready to be cooked at home until the sauce becomes sticky and caramelised.

Tsukune is another popular Japanese izakaya dish of minced chicken skewers, usually cooked on a robata grill. Machiya uses free-range, corn-fed chicken for its skewers, which are cooked in a tare glaze (a flavour-packed sauce made with lemongrass, soy, mirin, saké, house-made chicken stock and more). Once sticky and caramelised, the skewers are served with an egg yolk for dunking into.

“Kakuni means ‘cooked cube’,” explains George about the final dish, “we slow-braise cubes of pork belly in an umami, soy-based broth until really tender.” Chunks of daikon (Japanese white radish) are then added, before cooking again - “the idea is that the daikon cleanses the palate after the richness of the pork and broth.” To finish, the dish is topped with a fudgy, soy-marinated egg known as ajitsuke tamago.

Closing the menu is Machiya’s renowned melting matcha fondant. Earthy matcha from Uji, Japan is paired with sweet, creamy white chocolate to create a warm sponge-like dessert with an oozing, molten centre. Enjoy alongside a comforting cup of genmaicha – a Japanese brown rice green tea.