Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Asma’s Family Favourites Feast asma-khan

Asma’s Family Favourites

Regular price
£65.00
Sale price
£65.00
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Tax included.

“This is exactly the kind of food I eat at home with my family,” says Asma Khan, “Indian food isn’t served in courses – we tend to eat everything together, with a myriad of different flavours and spices to stimulate the palate, from spicy to sour to sweet.”

The feast begins with street food staple chana chat – a mix of spiced chickpeas and onion topped with crunchy papri (a kind of Indian cracker), sev (crunchy gram flour noodles) and tamarind chutney.

“This is a very special dish for me and my family, which we’d often eat on Sundays,” says Asma about her lamb tamatar gosht. To make it, she slow-cooks British lamb leg pieces in a rich curry sauce made with plenty of garlic, ginger, onions and chilli, as well as slowly-simmered tomatoes. “I also add almond powder to thicken the sauce to just the right texture for scooping up with roti,” explains Asma.

For her vegetarian option, Asma cooks kala channa (black chickpeas) in a tomato-based curry sauce flavoured with garlic, ginger and roasted spices. “Kala chana are black chickpeas that are unique to Bengal,” explains Asma, “I might be biased, but I think once you’ve had black chickpeas, the white ones will never be as interesting or exciting! They’re denser in texture and have a lovely nutty flavour.”

Alongside the curry, Asma serves sada pulao, a Bengali celebration rice with cashew nuts and raisins in it, infused with fragrant cardamom, cloves and cassia. There’s also delicate, saffron-infused rotis; a raita made with fresh British beetroot and dry-roasted cumin; and poppadoms with a sweet tomato chutney flavoured with Bengali spice blend, panchporan.

“Coconut ladoo is a traditional family dessert,” says Asma about her sweet, “I have fond memories of sitting out in the courtyard rolling endless ladoos on special occasions.” To make them, she cooks fresh grated coconut with sugar, milk, cardamom and chopped nuts, then cools and rolls into soft, squidgy spheres.